Simply Music and Autism

This is the wonderful piano method that I am now using with all of my children, teen and adult students. Lots of fun and the most effective method of learning piano I have ever seen!


New students are starting this June and also in the fall. Give me a call.

Hearing Patterns

When children drum along to the rhythms in a song or to their own name, they practice careful listening and pattern recognition. This is one way children hear sounds in words – a skill necessary for word recognition, speaking, reading, and writing (adapted from “Show and Tell”).
LEARN AT HOME! Have your child focus on listening to you as you say, shake, or drum a rhythmic pattern. Then, model active listening by letting your child attempt to copy you. The result may or may not be the same pattern you modeled; remember that there are no “wrong” answers, as we are focusing on process, not performance! If your child responded with a different pattern, echo the new pattern back to her. If your child responded with the same pattern you modeled, try modeling a new pattern the next time.

New Baby Class to Begin!


Call or email me now if you are interested in joining us on Tuesday evenings at 5:30 pm. You can also register online. We being Dewdrops on March 30. That will run for 8 weeks. I have been asked to follow it with a 5 week session of Sign & Sing. Check out our Kindermusik home page for more info about all of our classes.

Neuroscientist: Think twice about cutting music in schools | ScienceBlog.com

“Playing an instrument may help youngsters better process speech in noisy classrooms and more accurately interpret the nuances of language that are conveyed by subtle changes in the human voice,” says Nina Kraus, Hugh Knowles Professor of Neurobiology, Physiology and Communication Sciences at Northwestern University.

“Cash-strapped school districts are making a mistake when they cut music from the K-12 curriculum,” says Kraus, director of the Auditory Neuroscience Laboratory in Northwestern’s School of Communication.

Kraus will present her own research and the research of other neuroscientists suggesting music education can be an effective strategy in helping typically developing children as well as children with developmental dyslexia or autism more accurately encode speech.

“People’s hearing systems are fine-tuned by the experiences they’ve had with sound throughout their lives,” says Kraus. “Music training is not only beneficial for processing music stimuli. We’ve found that years of music training may also improve how sounds are processed for language and emotion.”

Read the full article:

Neuroscientist: Think twice about cutting music in schools | ScienceBlog.com.